The first time someone told Johan Vazquez he should sell homemade guacamole that he brought to a get-together, he was stunned.

“I laughed and asked, ‘What do you mean? It’s just guac’,” he said. “But over time, people kept telling me, ‘You have some killer guac’.”

And over time, Vazquez listened.

Vazquez, born in Puebla, Mexico, made his first professional guacamole sale on Feb. 2, 2019, under the name “Johan’s Guac n’ Squat”. Hundreds of avocados and a handful of new recipes later, Vazquez’s new business has become a favorite at the Goshen Farmer’s Market.

Vazquez will stand behind any one of his variations – which range from a traditional recipe to new and inventive flavors like curry mango – but one he is particularly proud of is the Nahuatl.

The Nahuatl is an authentic family recipe from Vazquez’s hometown in Mexico. He asked his aunt to teach him her recipe and he adapted it to make it more suitable for commercial sales.

Customers have loved the authentic guac (if people can handle the heat, it’s usually bought after a sample), but Vazquez is glad to have a chance to show a bit of the real authentic Mexico that he knows.

And, the guacamole comes with a short history lesson.

Nahuatl is an Aztec language spoken by just under 2 million people in central Mexico. Ever since the conquistadors invaded Mexico and brought Spanish, the language has been dying.

Ahuaca-molli is the word used for what we know today as guacamole from the Nahuatl language.

Molli meaning, “Something mashed” whilst ahuacatl meant testicles, because that’s what the fruit reminded the Aztecs of (fun fact, huh?).

“I wanted to give homage to the original people who invented guacamole, the indigenous people of Mexico,” Vazquez said. “I want to use my guacamole as a tool for education, to show them who they have to thank for the product.”

Whether a new customer stops by his booth at the Goshen Farmer’s Market to try the Nahuatl or another flavor, Vazquez said he owes God for his gift of entrepreneurship.

“The best part is when someone agrees to a sample and then I see this look of surprise on their face,” hesaid. “Not even getting a sale or selling five pounds of guac at one time compares to that feeling. I didn’t get a lot of encouragement growing up, so it’s super cool to see someone take time out of their life to try something I made from scratch.”

Guac N’ Squat

Johan Vazquez founded Guac N’ Squat after a winding life path that led him from Puebla, Mexico, toGoshen, Indiana.

Vazquez found himself called to ministry and spent several years at The Honor Academy in Lindale,Texas. When that ministry went financially bankrupt, Vazquez was lost – until God revealed a new planto him. Three days after he lost his job, he arrived in northern Indiana and started working at Carved.

Years later, Vazquez started working as a full-time apprentice tailor under Kevin Koch, but felt called on by God onceagain to change his career.

With a pregnant wife and a one-year-old daughter, Vazquez quit his job and took a leap of faith to startGuac N’ Squat. While he’s happy at the Goshen Farmer’s Market currently, Vazquez is looking to a foodtruck or food stand in the future.

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“I wanted to give homage to the original people who invented guacamole, the indigenous people of Mexico. I want to use my guacamole as a tool for education, to show them who they have to thank for the product.”
Johan Vazquez

Owner/founder, Guac N' Squat